Other Articles

Kayak Fishing

Submitted by Mandi on September 22, 2011 - 10:19am

Probably the oldest recorded use of kayaks for fishing is the Inuit People who used the predecessor to our modern sea kayaks for hunting and fishing. Today there are 3 main types of boat that can be used for fishing. Canoe (open boat single blade paddle), Closed Cockpit Kayaks and SOTs (sit on tops), the latter is by far the most popular. The main advantages of the SOT over the other two are its inherent stability, ease of paddling and, should you happen to fall off, with the proper practice and training you can get back on board easily without the need to empty out any water.
There are several things you need to consider prior to parting with your hard earned cash. The type of fishing you want to do, your size and build and where you intend to use the SOT.

kayak

 

The best advice we can give is to find a good quality outlet that can give appropriate advice and, quite often, even let you try out a few different models before you buy. Most people neglect one of the most important pieces of equipment - the paddle! You could do several thousand paddle strokes through the course of a day so a heavy or wrong sizes paddle could be a real disadvantage, leading to excess fatigue and even injury.
You should also never forget your own safety and a correctly sized and fitted buoyancy aid is a must. These come in many forms, from the very basic to one with loads of pockets for all your gear. Depending on where you are paddling you should also consider taking further safety kit appropriate to the environment. It’s best not to paddle alone but if you must then make sure someone knows where you are going and what time you should be back.
So you have all the gear so where can you go fishing?
In the South West we are surrounded by the sea and generally there is no restriction to taking you kayak afloat and going fishing. At some locations you may be required to pay a launch fee but usually this is a fairly modest amount.
Within the South West there are numerous inland lakes and reservoirs, most of which allow fishing and a lot also now allow kayak fishing. One of the more proactive ones, South West Lakes Trust (www.swlakestrust.org.uk), have organised Flyyak (Fly fishing from kayaks) events which have proved a great success. Access to inland rivers is much more restricted and you would need to gain the permission of the relevant owner/authority prior to kayak fishing on these waters.
If you require further advice there are several places you could turn to:
For advice on training and safety visit Canoe England at www.canoe-england.org.uk
A useful forum at: www.anglersafloat.co.uk

The Angling Trust now provides a kayak - specific membership which includes insurance and much more at www.anglingtrust.net

If You Can’t See It How Can You Count It?

Submitted by Mandi on September 21, 2011 - 3:46pm

Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust
Salmon & Trout Research Centre
East Stoke
Wareham
Dorset
BH20 6BB

Fish have one very large disadvantage for those who study them – it is very difficult and often impossible to see them! Fishery scientists therefore often resort to a wide range of methods and technological wizardry that help overcome this problem. On the river Frome at East Stoke in Dorset scientists have developed one of the most technologically advanced Atlantic salmon monitoring facilities in Europe. The river Frome is the most westerly chalk stream in England and hosts a large variety of wildlife. Historically it was also renowned as a good river for catching large 20-40 lb salmon. In the early 1970’s it was chosen as a site to test new and developing technology for counting adult salmon when they go up rivers to spawn. The most successful of these methods was a resistivity fish counter. In this, electronics measure the electrical resistance of an area of water. When a fish crosses this area the resistance of the water is changed and thus the fish is detected and counted. In various forms this system has been used at East Stoke to count the adult salmon since 1973.

This monitoring has shown that the adults suffered a dramatic 75% decline in the early 1990’s. This dramatic reduction was also found in most of the fisheries in the North Atlantic, indicating that the marine survival of the fish was becoming a major problem. Attempting to manage and conserve the salmon at sea is an impossible task; however, it is possible to manage the juvenile fish while they are growing in the rivers. To understand the pressures on these juvenile fish, in the mid 1990’s the scientists began trying to estimate the number of smolts that go out to sea. The task of counting these small fish seemed at first impossible. They are only about 12 cm long and often migrate when the river is in a spring spate. Once again cutting edge technology came to the rescue in the form of small Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. These tags (about the size of a grain of rice), each having a unique id code, are harmlessly implanted into the fish in the autumn. Then in spring they are detected and recorded by sophisticated electronic detectors at East Stoke.

A great Salmon on the Frome

Two years ago this unique research facility looked like it would close. Fortunately the Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust took on the management of the research and the staff and therefore the groundbreaking research is continuing. It allows the scientists to assess the numbers of juvenile salmon present in the autumn, both count the smolts that survive from these autumn fish and determine what parts of the river are good (or bad) for juvenile survival. The work then completes the cycle by counting the returning adult fish. This research will help identify where survival of salmon in the river can be improved and help offset the problems that the fish encounter in the marine environment. The results will be applicable to a wide range of rivers in the UK and will enable targeted intelligent management of salmon populations and will give vital information on factors influencing the life history characteristics of this species with a view to halting the decline and restoring salmon populations to former levels.

An annual report detailing the salmon numbers and the research carried out at the Salmon & Trout Research Centre at East Stoke can be found on the GWCT web site: www.gwct.org.uk

Gloves Off: Scientists Chart Chinese Mitten Crab Invasion

Submitted by Mandi on September 19, 2011 - 12:03pm

Press release 19 September 2011


Gloves off: Scientists Chart Chinese Mitten Crab Invasion

Become a nature detective and record the invasion of the alien Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis) in rivers of England and Wales. Scientists from a number of UK research institutes, including London's Natural History Museum are calling for the public to become nature detectives this autumn to better understand the full extent of the Chinese mitten crab invasion and the threat these crustaceans pose to our rivers and waterways. Anglers, waterway workers, boating enthusiasts and other nature lovers to identify and record any sightings of the alien species via an online survey. The recordings will be used by scientists to clarify the full distribution of the exotic crabs in English and Welsh rivers.

Mitten Crab

 

 

 

 

 

Chinese mitten crabs are now one of the most notorious aquatic invasive species featuring in the international list of the world’s 100 worst invasive species. They are regarded as a pest because they cause damage to fishing gear and unprotected river banks, block water systems as well as compete with native species for food and habitat. Current records show that mitten crabs have established populations in the Thames, Medway, Ouse Washes, Humber and the Dee Estuary. Sightings from all rivers and watersheds will be useful but researchers are particularly interested in any from:

• The Thames west of Windsor to beyond Reading

• Tyne, Tees and Wear in the North East

• Dee and Merseyside and the

• Severn Estuary to the Isle of Wight in the South West.

Nature lovers can report their finds by phone, email or online and upload their photographs by visiting www.mittencrabs.org.uk. For more information please contact the following:

London and the South East:

Claire Gilby, Natural History Museum Press Office, 0207 942 5654, [email protected] Sophia Haque, Royal Holloway University London Press Office, 01784 44 3552, [email protected]
Tyneside and the North East:

Louella Houldcroft, Newcastle University Press Office, 0191 222 5108, [email protected]

North West England and Wales:

Bran Devey, Countryside Council for Wales Press Office, 02920 77 2403, [email protected]

South West England: Guy Baker, Marine Biological Association Press Office, 01752 633 244, [email protected]

• For more information about mitten crabs and the survey visit www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/life/other-invertebrates/chinese-mitten-crabs/ and www.marlin.ac.uk/marine_aliens

• The consortium of UK research institutes working on the project are:

• The Natural History Museum, London • Newcastle University

• Royal Holloway University of London

• The Countryside Council for Wales

• Marine Biological Association

• All records will be archived by DASSH, the UK archive for marine biodiversity data and will be available online via the project website www.mittencrabs.org.uk and the National Biodiversity Network (www.searchnbn.net ).

• Nature detectives can report their records by telephone or email in the following way:

• Sightings from the Isle of Wight to the Humber estuary can be logged with the Natural History Museum, 0207 942 6170, [email protected]

• Sightings from the Humber estuary to the Scottish border on the east coast and Scottish border to Blackpool on the West coast can be logged with Newcastle University, 0191 222 5345, [email protected]

• Sightings from NW England from the Mersey to the Dee Estuary and the whole of Wales to the Severn estuary, can be logged with the Countryside Council for Wales, 0845 1306 229, [email protected]

• Sightings from the Severn Estuary, Cornwall to Isle of Wight can be logged with the Marine Biological Association, 01752 633291, [email protected]

• The Chinese mitten crab, (Eriocheir sinensis) originates from the Far East, with a native distribution from the Province of Fukien, China. It spread throughout northern Europe following its accidental introduction into Germany in 1912 from ships’ ballast water.

• Chinese mitten crabs are currently found throughout Europe from Kemi, Finland in the north, through Sweden, Russia, Poland, Germany, Czech Republic (Prague), Netherlands, Belgium and England to France and the Atlantic coast Portugal and Spain.

• Mitten crabs feature in the IUCN-ISGG database of the world’s 100 worst invasive species.

• The first record from the Thames catchment was captured on the intake screens of Lots Road Power Station at Chelsea in 1935 with a second from Southfields Reservoir, near Castleford, Yorkshire, 1948. Three male crabs were found in 1976 at the West Thurrock power station, located approximately 36 km downstream of the City of London. An ovigerous (egg carrying) crab was collected at Southend-on-Sea in 1979 and a further 20 specimens were noted again from West Thurrock in 1982.

• During the late eighties the mitten crab population increased dramatically in the Thames as demonstrated by a survey conducted by the Museum funded by the Environment Agency in 1996. The most westerly sighting being the River Colne at Staines with reports of mitten crabs from almost every Thames tributary eastwards of this point. In October 2007 a mitten crab was caught on rod and line near Boveney Loch, Windsor Racecourse which suggests mitten crab are gradually spreading westward.

• Project sponsors include the Welsh Government; Environment Agency; Countryside Council for Wales; Non-Native Species Secretariat; Fishmongers’ Hall, London Bridge; and Tyne Rivers Trust.

• Winner of Visit London’s 2010 Evening Standard’s Peoples Choice Best London for Free Experience Award and Best Family Fun Award the Natural History Museum is also a world-leading science research centre. Through its collections and scientific expertise, the Museum is helping to conserve the extraordinary richness and diversity of the natural world with groundbreaking projects in more than 70 countries.

• Royal Holloway, University of London is one of the UK’s leading teaching and research university institutions, ranked in the top 20 for research in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise. One of the larger colleges of the University of London, Royal Holloway has a strong profile across the sciences, social sciences, arts and humanities. Its 8,000 students work with internationally-renowned scholars in 18 academic departments. Over 20% of students are postgraduates and 22% come from 130 different countries. Renowned for its iconic Founder’s Building, Royal Holloway is situated on an extensive parkland campus in Egham, Surrey, only 40 minutes from central London.

• The Marine Biological Association (MBA) is a professional body for marine scientists with some 1200 members world-wide. Since 1884 the MBA has established itself as a leading marine biological research organization contributing to the work of several Nobel Laureates and over 170 Fellows of the Royal Society. The MBA is a founder member of the Plymouth Marine Sciences Partnership.

Fishing At Siblyback With South West Fishing For Life

Submitted by Mandi on August 26, 2011 - 10:08am

 

 

 

 

 

South West Fishing For Life launched their 3rd group in Cornwall in April The group has just 4 members at the moment but will grow as people hear about what fun and therapy fishing can be, in a beautiful location.

   As one member said “a soul healing experience”

We have lovely qualified coaches who run the days and ladies who meet and greet and provide refreshments.

Fishing at Siblyback

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 This group meets on the 3rd Sunday of the month from 2 pm – 4pm

 To find out more information about SWFFL please look at our web site www.southwestfishingforlife.org.uk

If you would like to see what we do on our days please contact:

Gillian
Holworhthy Farm
Brompton Regis
Dulverton
Somerset
TA22 9NY
Tel: 01398 371244

or email [email protected]

Chew Valley Lake wins 2011 Alan Faulkner Memorial Award

Submitted by Mandi on August 17, 2011 - 10:24am

 

 

 Suzuki way of life logo

 

 

*Press Release* Press Release* Press Release* Press Release*

Chew Valley Lake wins 2011 Alan Faulkner Memorial Award

On behalf of The Wheelyboat Trust, veteran actor and passionate angler Bernard Cribbins presented Steve Taylor from Bristol Water’s Chew Valley Lake with this year’s Alan Faulkner Memorial Award. The presentation took place on Friday, 22nd July at the CLA Game Fair. The main prize was a 4hp outboard motor provided by the award’s sponsors, Suzuki GB. Created in memory of the Trust’s Founder President, the award is presented annually to the game fishery that provides disabled anglers with the most outstanding service, facilities, opportunities and access. Previous winners include Eyebrook Trout Fishery, Grafham Water, Lake of Menteith and Toft Newton. Chew Valley Lake is Bristol Water’s largest reservoir at over 1,000 acres and was built in the 1950s. It is one of the country’s finest trout fisheries and is renowned for its ‘top of the water’ sport owing to its relatively shallow depth, fertile water and abundant fly life. It is a fly only water and is stocked annually with 50,000 brown and rainbow trout. It also has a healthy population of pike that are of increasing interest to game anglers, many of whom are turning their attention to this large predator – fly fishing for pike is now a well-established and popular activity on the lake. Chew was the first UK water to acquire the then new Mk III Wheelyboat model in 2006 to help it celebrate the 50th anniversary of its opening by HM Queen Elizabeth II.

 

Alan Faulkner Memorial Award Picture

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo caption (left to right): Steven Foy (Sales Manager Suzuki GB), Steve Taylor (Assistant Fishery Manager, Chew Valley Lake), Bernard Cribbins, Andy Beadsley (Director, The Wheelyboat Trust)

The award’s judges were very impressed with Chew’s commitment to disabled anglers: the facilities there are first class, all are wheelchair accessible and the staff are helpful and courteous – essential requirements for a hassle-free day’s fishing in the Wheelyboat. As well as being a fitting memorial to The Wheelyboat Trust’s Founder President who conceived the idea of the wheelchair accessible boat, the ‘Wheelyboat’, the award is intended to highlight the needs of disabled anglers and encourage fisheries to ensure those needs are accommodated. The Trust is delighted that Suzuki GB sponsored the award again this year with the main prize of a 4hp 4-stroke outboard. Without their support and appreciation of the award’s aims, it would not be the sought after title it has now become. The Suzuki small outboard range, from 4 to 15 horsepower, has attracted a strong following amongst anglers, due to the quiet running, low emissions and 4-stroke fuel economy. In common with the rest of the 2hp to 300hp range, they offer excellent value for money. Background The Wheelyboat Trust is a registered charity that promotes and provides the wheelchair accessible Wheelyboat to fisheries and other waters open to the public all over the UK. It has now supplied 147 Wheelyboats since the Trust began work in 1985. It offers four different types of Wheelyboat to suit different activities - two of these have been designed specifically for fishing. This is the eighth year that Suzuki GB have sponsored the Alan Faulkner Memorial Award. The Wheelyboat Trust (reg charity no 292216) - Andy Beadsley, Director North Lodge, Burton Park, Petworth, West Sussex, GU28 0JT Telephone 01798 342222, 07860 650023 [email protected], www.wheelyboats.org

Wheelyboat Press Release Summer 2011

Submitted by Mandi on August 3, 2011 - 2:40pm

THE WHEELYBOAT Trust’s 25th anniversary
year in 2010 proved an especially busy one
with projects getting under way and
Wheelyboats being launched all over the UK
and Ireland. A particular highlight was the
development and launch of a new model, the
Mk IV, in partnership with Bristol Sailability.
Other notable achievements were the six
Coulam 16 Wheelyboats and five Mk III
Wheelyboats launched along with five older
Wheelyboats that were refurbished and
found new homes.
The momentum has carried on into 2011 and new
projects continue to develop, including two new Mk IVs.
One of these will be operated by Thorney Island’s Army
Welfare Service in and around Chichester Harbour and
will directly benefit injured and
disabled service personnel.
Currently under construction is a
Mk III for the Tees Wheelyboats Club—
a club set up specifically to operate
their own Wheelyboat on the River
Tees at Stockton. We have been able
to help them raise the funds to acquire
their much needed boat.
None of what we have achieved
would have been possible without the
support and generosity of our donors,
either for individual projects or for help
with our day to day running costs. Our
tremendous thanks go to you all!
SINCE THE last issue of Waterwheels the following
Wheelyboats have been supplied:
Mk IVs
Bristol Sailability, Bristol Docks—P, 0117 968 8244
Mk IIIs
Tamar Lakes, Bude—C P N, 01288 321712
Rudyard Lake, Leek—C P N, 01538 306280
Leitrim APD, Co Leitrim—C T S P N, 00 353 719 651000
East Park Lake, Hull—P N, 01482 331966
The Waterside, Rollesby Broad—C P N, 01493 740531
Coulam 16 Wheelyboats
Blithfield Reservoir, Rugeley—T, 01283 840284
Grafham Water, St Neots—T, 01480 810531
Hanningfield Reservoir, Wickford—T C, 01268 712815
Bewl Water, Tunbridge Wells—T, 01892 890352
Farmoor Reservoir, Oxford—T, 07747 640707
Kielder Water—T, 0845 155 0236
Refurbished Wheelyboats
Elinor Trout Fishery, Kettering (Mk I)—T, 01832 720786
Butterstone Loch, Dunkeld (Mk I)—T, 01350 724238
Upton Warren OEC, Bromsgrove (Mk II)—P N, 01527 861426
Norwich Pike Anglers, River Yare (Mk II)—C, 07776 221959
Craufurd Trout Fishery, Fenwick (Mk I)—T, 01560 600569
Key: Fishing T (trout), S (salmon), St (sea-trout), C (coarse),
Sea (sea), P - pleasure boating, N - bird/nature watching
Wheelyboats Supplied 2010/11

Rare 'Kipper' Makes Welcome Return To The Tamar

Submitted by Mandi on July 13, 2011 - 11:13am

 

 

 

 

 

 

       Rare ‘Kipper’ Makes Welcome Return To The Tamar     

One of the UK’s rarest fish, the Allis Shad, is returning to the Tamar estuary in good numbers. Like the salmon, this relative of the herring spends most of its time at sea and only returns to freshwater to breed. Barriers to migration including weirs or dams and pollution are thought to be the main reasons for a severe decline in its numbers. Over-fishing is also believed to be a contributory factor. The Tamar estuary and the Solway Firth are currently the only known sites in the UK where allis shad regularly spawn. Environment Agency officers have noticed an increase in the number of allis shad on the Tamar this year. Not only are they more numerous, the fish are larger – in some cases up to 5 lbs.The population is strongly cyclical with boom and bust years. ‘We’ve caught some fine Allis Shad in our fish trap at Gunnislake – many of them above average size. We’ve also identified at least three spawning areas on the Tamar. Rare Kipper Makes a Welcome Return To The Tamar

 

2011 will certainly be remembered as a year when this species was present in abundance. It is excellent news because it is evidence of the high water quality and favourable river conditions in the Tamar,’ said Paul Elsmere for the Environment Agency. With its streamlined body and deeply forked tail, the allis shad closely resembles the more common twaite shad. Both species are members of the herring family. Being very bony fish, they are not especially valued for their culinary qualities. The allis shad is referred to by some as the ‘Bony Horseman.’ Outside the breeding season, the fish are mainly found in shallow coastal waters. Around April - June they enter large rivers with strong currents and stony or sandy beds to spawn.

 

Adults spawn at night with a great deal of noisy splashing Young fish remain in the river or estuary of their birth for up to two years before migrating to sea. A genetic study carried out by the Environment Agency, Bristol University and Marine Biological Association showed that the allis shad in the Tamar have a different genetic make-up to fish using the Solway Firth suggesting they are a distinct population. The allis shad is protected under the EC Habitats Directive and Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 which makes it an offence to intentionally kill them or damage or destroy their spawning grounds. In Europe, the species is targeted by fly fishermen who value its hard-fighting qualities. Singing its praises, one angler on his return from a fishing trip to France, described the allis shad as a ‘turbo-charged kipper.’

Eel Friendly Fisheries Scheme

Submitted by Mandi on June 9, 2011 - 9:04am

 

 

The National Anguilla Club is one of the country’s longest running specimen angling clubs being formed back in 1962. Its membership has fluctuated between 10 to 50 members but is now at an all time high with well over 100 senior members. In the early days some eels were killed by the membership so that in-depth studies could be carried out to better understand this mysterious creature. The freshwater eel population is in serious decline, the club has evolved to meet the challenges that face the eels future with the appointment of environmental officers and a hard line approach to eel conservation issues. The eel has declined by 99% since the 1980s and a pan European research Group under the title of Indicang has proven that the situation is now critical. To put this in perspective the European freshwater eel is currently deemed the most at risk vertebrate in the country and is on the International Union for Conservation of Nature ( ICUN ) Red list. This list contains species at risk and is split into categories depending on the severity of the risk, the eel is currently classed as critically endangered, the next stage is Extinct in the Wild. To combat the challenge’s facing the freshwater eel the National Anguilla Club is launching a new scheme that hopes to highlight how we as anglers and fishery owners can make a difference.

The Eel Friendly Fishery Scheme is open to commercial fisheries, Clubs and Association’s and a fishery can achieve eel friendly status following a successful application. The fishery would have met the criteria required and agreed to enhance the eel’s habitat where possible within the fishery. The NAC can advise the fishery on habitat improvements. These can be as simple as leaving a small area of the lake to remain overgrown and weedy to placing sunken pipes and floating islands in a designated area. The main criteria is the adoption of a code of practice. This code relates to the eel within the fishery environment and is fundamental to the process, the code contains aspects relevant to anglers and fishery owners. Many people have a preconceived view of eels and, like sharks, they suffer from a poor overall image usually attributed to their snakelike appearance and movement. In reality the freshwater eel is a valuable asset to the fishery environment and nearly all lakes, ponds and canals still contain a stock of mature eels.

 

5lb 2 0z Eel form South West Fishery

Many of these resident eels are mature females remaining within a watercourse until the time is right for them to migrate back to the Sargasso Sea. Eels are extremely slow growing and a rule of thumb is that an eel takes 10 years to grow 1lb in weight. So a 5lb specimen eel could be as much as 50 years old. These large female eels are the most sought after by the NAC membership as the male eel rarely exceeds 2lbs and an eel needs to top 4lb to be classed as a specimen. As a fishery owner or angler why should the decline of the eel make any difference to you?

Well, as a keystone species the eel is an integral part of the food chain. Otters have historically fed on a rich diet of eels previously abundant within the country’s river systems. The decline in eels has surely led to the modern otter finding alternative prey in the form of lake fish. Many modern fisheries do not contain predators but are subject to the occasional fish fatality. Eels clean up the dead and dying, thereby helping to prevent disease.

The Club has also begun to discover a connection with crayfish that could be beneficial in the removal of the infamous signal crayfish. Waters with large heads of crayfish seem to be devoid of eels and waters with a good population of eels have few or no crayfish.

Eels are perfectly designed for hunting crayfish and can enter their burrows easily, several members have caught large eels that have regurgitated crayfish. I hope that anglers and fishery owners will see the benefits in conserving the freshwater eel and do something positive by signing up to the Eel Friendly Fishery Scheme.

Anyone interested in finding out more about the eel and the National Anguilla Club can visit the clubs website at: www.nationalanguillaclub.co.uk

To find more about The Eel Friendly Fishery Scheme contact Steve Dawe at: [email protected]

Anglers Embrace The Big Society

Submitted by Mandi on May 27, 2011 - 11:38am

ANGLERS EMBRACE THE BIG SOCIETY! 3rd RIVERFLY CONFERENCE DEMONSTRATES HOW RIVER SCIENTISTS CARVE A BRIGHT FUTURE FOR UK RIVERS Lord (Chris) Smith, Environment Agency Chairman, champions rivers Big Society working in partnership with the angling community. Riverfly Partnership’s Anglers’ Monitoring Initiative (AMI) given as prime example The 3rd Riverfly Conference, held on Thursday March 10th at the Natural History Museum, organised by the Riverfly Partnership - a network of 100 partners - and hosted by the Salmon & Trout Association on behalf of the Partners, attracted a “full house” audience drawn from all quarters of UK fishery and aquatic environment interests, in the 200-seater Flett Theatre. The conference, Your Rivers – Their Future, united for the first time citizen scientists (anglers and community groups), regulators, regulated organisations and academic interests on an equal platform.

Flyyak 2010 Press Release

Submitted by Mandi on February 6, 2011 - 4:34pm

Pupils from Robert Blake School in Bridgwater enjoyed a fun filled day (28th June) learning fly fishing and Kayaking skills taught by fully licensed coaches as part of a new sporting initiative called FLYYAK 2010. This is a multi partner initiative supported by the Angling Development Board, Angling Trust, Canoe England, South West Lakes Trust and the Environment Agency.The pupils arrived at 9.30am at the beautiful surroundings of the South West lakes trust Wimbleball Trout and Sailing lakes. They were joined by another group of students from Blundell School in Tiverton.
The order of the day was as followed: Once they were all separated into two groups, the first group had an hour’s fly fishing tuition and the other an hour’s kayaking instruction, then the two groups switched over until everyone had learned the basic skills needed to safely power and control the Kayak and of course to successfully cast a fly. Lunch was then the order of the day with freshly caught barbequed trout caught from the venue earlier that morning. Once everyone was refreshed, they were all paired up and given a two person kayak, a fly rod, and a paddle, the pupils then had a amazing afternoon of exploration, paddling and casting about, taking it in turns one to paddle while the other was trying to catch one of the many trout that reside within this huge reservoir.
Unfortunately, no one managed to catch anything on this occasion this was mainly put down to the very sunny and warm conditions that were felt on the day with temperatures soaring to over 23 degrees centigrade. Nevertheless, all the participants involved had an amazing day and have hopefully caught the bug for fishing of kayaking or indeed both: “FLYYAK”ing.
Comments from partners involved:
Dean Sandford from the Angling Development Board (South West) “the day has been an amazing success and I would like to thank the Environment Agency for helping to fund this initial pilot project which will hopefully be the first of many multi partner events within the South West region throughout the rest of the year and beyond”. For further information on angling development please contact Dean on: [email protected]
Andy Davey from Canoe England (South West) said “it is fantastic to see so many young people enjoying the day a float” and went onto say “it’s great to be able to offer schools an innovative project that covers two sports for the price of one, especially within these challenging financial times”. For further paddle sports development information please contact Andy on: [email protected]
John Dawson level 2 game angling coach: “I have really enjoyed teaching these potential new participants to our wonderful sport and I think the two sports really complement each other”.
Contact John on www.johndawson.co.uk
Darryl Birch the South West Lakes Trust Exmoor and Wimbelball Lake manager said “The pupils from both schools have had a brilliant time” he then went on to say that a Flyyak competition will be held for competent game anglers at the upcoming LakesFest 2010 being held at the venue on the 14th to the 18th July as part of the celebrations for the 10 years anniversary of the South West Lakes Trust
and partners on Exmoor, for further information please see: www.swlakestrust.org.uk/10years/lakefest2010

Environment Agency - Update Fish Removal Bylaw 2010

Submitted by Mandi on September 20, 2010 - 12:00pm

ENVIRONMENT AGENCY

WATER RESOURCES ACT 1991

FISH REMOVAL (ROD and LINE) BYELAWS

The Environment Agency, in exercise of powers conferred on it under section 210 of,
and paragraph 6(1)(b) of Schedule 25 to the Water Resources Act 1991 hereby makes
the following Byelaws.

Byelaw 1 Application of Byelaws

These Byelaws shall apply to the area (specified in Section 6(7) of the Environment
Act 1995) in respect of which the Agency carries out its functions relating to fisheries
except the Upper Esk.

Byelaw 2 Interpretation of Byelaws

In these Byelaws except where expressly stated or where the context otherwise
requires, all words and expressions used in these Byelaws shall have the meanings
assigned to them by the Environment Act 1995, Salmon and Freshwater Fisheries Act
1975 and the Water Resources Act 1991 except the meaning of the term “drain” is not
confined to that assigned to it by the Water Resources Act 1991

“Upper Esk” has the same meaning as assigned to it in the Scotland Act 1998 (Border
Rivers) Order 1999.

Byelaw 3 Fish Removal

(i) No person may remove by rod and line any freshwater fish listed in Schedule 1
from any river, stream or drain, or from the waters listed in either Schedule 2 or
Schedule 3 except:

(a) 15 fish, other than grayling, of not more than 20cm per day.

(b) 1 pike of not more than 65cm per day.

(c) 2 grayling of not less than 30cm and not more than 38cm per day.

The size of any fish shall be ascertained by measuring from the tip of the snout to the
fork or cleft of the tail.

Byelaw 3(i) does not apply where written permission has been given by the
Environment Agency to the owner or occupier of the fishery to dispense with any of
these requirements in relation to those fishing the owner's or occupier’s waters.

(ii) No person may remove by rod and line any freshwater fish from any stillwaters or
canals (other than those listed in Schedules 2 or 3) except with the written permission
of the owner or occupier of the fishery.

(iii) No person may remove by rod and line any eels or, subject to the provisions of
sections 9 and 28P of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, shad from any waters.


Subject to the provisions of sections 9 and 28P of the Wildlife and Countryside Act
1981, Byelaw 3 shall not apply to any person who with as little injury as possible
either returns fish immediately to the same water alive or retains fish in a keepnet or
keepsack and then returns it to the same water alive on or before completion of
fishing.

Byelaw 4 Amendments and Revocations

(i) The amendments to existing Byelaws set out in Schedule 4 shall have effect

(ii) The revocations of existing Byelaws set out in Schedule 5 shall have effect.

These Byelaws come into force on 1 June 2010



SCHEDULE 1

Fish species

Species

Common name

Abramis bjoerkna

Silver bream

Abramis brama

Common bream

Barbus barbus

Barbel

Carassius carassius

Crucian carp

Cyprinus carpio

Common carp

Leuciscus cephalus

Chub

Leuciscus leuciscus

Dace

Rutilus rutilus

Roach

Scardinius erythrophthalmus

Rudd

Tinca tinca

Tench

Esox lucius

Pike

Osmerus eperlanus

Smelt

Thymallus thymallus

Grayling

Perca fluviatilis

Perch

Including hybrids between any of the above
species.

Excluding ornamental varieties or colour variants of
the above species.



SCHEDULE 2

Stillwaters

England

Lake Windermere SD39395773

Coniston Water SD3082996365

Ullswater NY450220

Derwentwater NY200260

All waters within the Broads (as defined in section 2(3) of the Norfolk and Suffolk
Broads Act 1988) subject to a close season for freshwater fish.

Wales

Llyn Tegid SH 9143 3394

Llyn Maelog SH 3253 7316



SCHEDULE 3

Canals

North East Region:-

Aire and Calder navigation between Castleford Weir and
Ferrybridge Lock.

Midlands Region:-

Stroudwater and Thames Canal.

Anglian Region:-

Fossdyke Canal.

Thames Region:-

Kennet and Avon Canal downstream of confluence with River
Kennet at Kintbury.

Lee navigation upstream of Aqueduct Lock.



SCHEDULE 4

Amendments to Existing Byelaws

Taking/Removal of freshwater fish

1. For Byelaw numbered 6 (which applies in the Yorkshire area of the former
Northumbria & Yorkshire Region of the National Rivers Authority and was
confirmed on the 26th day of October 1967) substitute:-

Byelaw 6 Limitation on the number of fish which may be taken in one
day.

No person shall kill or take away from rivers, streams, drains or canals in the
Agency’s area in any one day more than six trout (including migratory trout
except when caught by a duly authorised net).

Provided that this byelaw shall not apply to any person who takes away more
than six such fish in any one day with the previous permission in writing of
the owner or occupier of the fishery.

2. For Byelaw numbered 7 (which applies in the Yorkshire area of the former
Northumbria and Yorkshire Region of the National Rivers Authority and was
confirmed on 26th day of April 2001) substitute:-

Byelaw 7 Taking of undersized trout

No person shall kill or take away from rivers, streams, drains or canals within
the Agency’s area any fish of the kinds hereinafter mentioned of a size less
than such as is hereinafter specified, that is to say:

Trout (including migratory trout) 23 cms

The size shall be ascertained by measuring from the tip of the snout to the fork
or cleft of the tail.

Provided that this byelaw shall not apply:

(ii) Undersized trout shall not be kept in a keepnet.

3. For Byelaw numbered 7 (which applies in the Yorkshire Ouse and Hull River
Authority area of the North East Region and was confirmed on 26th day of
October 1967) is hereby amended by the substitution for the table therein of
the following table:

Taking of under-sized trout

Trout (including
migratory trout)

23 cms


4. For Byelaw numbered 17 (which applies in the North West Region and which
was confirmed on 11th day of October 1989) substitute:-

Byelaw 17 Removal of fish

No person may take or remove from any waters within the area of the
Authority without lawful authority any salmon or trout, whether alive or dead.

5. For Byelaw numbered 19 (which applies in the North West Region and which
was confirmed on 11th day of October 1989) substitute:-

Byelaw 19 Prohibition of taking undersized fish

No person shall take from any waters within the area any fish of a kind and of
a size less than such size as is hereafter prescribed, that is to say:

Migratory trout 300mm

Brown trout and char 200mm

The size shall be ascertained by measuring from the tip of the snout to the fork
or cleft of the tail.

Provided that this byelaw shall not apply to any person who takes any
undersized fish unintentionally if he at once returns to and liberates the same
in the water with as little injury as possible.

6. For Byelaw numbered 8 (which applies in the Thames Region and was
confirmed on 6th day of June 1978) substitute:-

Byelaw 8 Prohibition on taking undersized fish

Any person who removes from rivers, streams, drains or canals within the area
any fish of a kind and of a size less than such as is hereinafter prescribed, that
is to say:

Brown Trout 25cm

shall be guilty of an offence.

The size shall be ascertained by measuring from the tip of the snout to the end
of the tail fin.

7. For Byelaw numbered 9 (which applies in the Thames Region and was
confirmed on 6th day of June 1978) substitute:-

Byelaw 9 Bag limits



Any person who without the previous consent in writing of the Agency takes
or removes more than two salmon in any one day from rivers, streams, drains
or canals shall be guilty of an offence.

8. For Byelaw numbered 17 (which applies in Wessex area of the South West
Region and was confirmed on 8th day of November 1993) substitute:-

Byelaw 17. Limit on the number of fish which may be permanently
removed from the water.

B. No person shall remove permanently from any waters within the
Bristol Avon Area or the Somerset Area in any one day more than two
non-migratory trout without the written consent of the Authority.

9. For Byelaw numbered 4 (which applies in Midlands Region and was
confirmed on 28th day of March 1991) substitute:-

Byelaw 4 The taking of immature trout

No person shall take any fish of a size less than those prescribed hereunder for
the species stated from the area stated. The size of the fish shall be ascertained
by measuring the fish from the tip of the snout to the fork or cleft of the tail.

a) trout (except rainbow trout)

i) The waters of the River Severn (including its tributaries) above
or upstream of its confluence with the Afon Clywedog (SN
954847); the waters of the River Vyrnwy (including its
tributaries) above or upstream of Dolanog Weir (SJ 067127);
the waters of the River Banwy (including its tributaries) above
or upstream of its confluence with the Afon Gam (SJ 017103);
the waters of the River Tanat (including its tributaries) above or
upstream of its confluence with the River Rhaeadr (SJ 130247)

............ 15 centimetres

ii) All other waters

............. 20 centimetres

b) rainbow trout

The waters of the Rivers Derwent and Amber, including their
tributaries, which are above or up-stream of their confluence at
Ambergate, Derbyshire, (NGR SK 346 515), excluding the stretch of
the River Wye from Blackwell Mill near Buxton to Cressbrook Mill
(NGR SK 173 727) above or upstream-of Ashford-in-the-Water and
excluding any reservoir or lake-formed by the construction of a dam
across the valley of those rivers or across one of their tributaries



............ 20 centimetres

PROVIDED that this byelaw shall not apply in the case of any person who
takes any immature (undersized) fish unintentionally if he at once returns the
same to the water with as little injury as possible.

10. For Byelaw numbered 14 (which applies in Wessex area of the South West
Region and was confirmed on 8th day of November 1993) substitute:-

14. Prohibition of taking undersized trout

No person shall without the lawful authority of the Environment Agency take
from any waters any fish of any kind hereinafter listed which from the tip of
the snout to the fork or cleft of the tail is of less than the size prescribed
hereunder:

brown
trout

25 centimetres, except that the size limit on the By Brook and its
tributaries shall be 20 centimetres

migratory
trout

35 centimetres

Provided that this Byelaw shall not apply to any person who catches any
undersized trout unintentionally if he at once returns the same to the water
with as little injury as possible.


SCHEDULE 5

Revocations of Existing Byelaws

Byelaw Number

Region

Date of confirmation

Taking/removal of
freshwater fish

5. Maximum number of
fish which can be taken.

Anglian

21 April 1988

Crucian Carp Crusader Wins Environmental Award

Submitted by Mandi on August 2, 2010 - 3:16pm

 

 

                           ***** Crucian Carp Crusader Wins Environmental Award ****

 

 

The Angling Trust and the CLA Game Fair are delighted to announce that Peter Rolfe is the winner of the first Fred J Taylor Award for Environmental Stewardship in the world of Angling. Peter is pictured with his trophy here (left), along with the Arthur Oglesby Award winner Hugh Miles (centre) and Bernard Cribbins (right). Peter was selected for his work over nearly four decades studying and conserving crucian carp, a species which has suffered a dramatic decline in numbers due to destruction of its habitat and hybridisation with feral goldfish and other carp. Peter was awarded with the Fred J Taylor Award at the CLA Game Fair on Saturday 24th July in the main theatre, along with a cash prize of £1,000 to spend on furthering his work.

In the 1970s, Peter restored, created and managed several field ponds for the benefit of crucian carp, tench and a host of other wildlife. Thousands of field ponds, once a common sight in the British countryside, have disappeared through neglect or deliberate infilling. In the 1980s, as secretary of his local angling club, Peter then moved on to creating two larger lakes of 2 and 3 acres respectively, stocked with fish which had bred in the field ponds, and restoring two half-acre lakes dating back to Saxon times. The latter he still manages as fisheries and wildlife reserves. In 1989, he set up a business raising water plants and fish, including crucian carp and tench.

He and his partners went on to create more than 20 new ponds, providing thousands of fish for stocking throughout the West Country. In the same year, he supervised restoration of two Victorian estate lakes of 2 acres each, which went on to produce fish approaching record weights. Now in his mid- seventies, Peter has just completed a book (Crock of Gold – Seeking the Crucian Carp, Mpress Ltd.) about crucian carp to pass on his knowledge to fishery managers following in his footsteps. This is the only book devoted entirely to this threatened species. Angling Trust received a small number of very high quality applications for this new award, all of which were entirely eligible to win. However Peter’s nomination stood out as being the precise embodiment of everything the Trust was trying to achieve by creating this award in memory of Fred J Taylor. Chris Yates, angling writer and star of the BBC TV series A Passion for Angling wrote in his testimonial to Peter’s work: “for several years now I have fished a pair of Saxon field ponds beautifully restored by Peter Rolfe.

Though small, these waters are now a favourite with me, not only because of their wonderful crucians and tench, but also because of their wilder inhabitants. In summer, the reedbeds are alive with damselflies and dragonflies; grass snakes bask on the banks, brook lampreys live in the feeder stream and the rare water vole lives under the banks. Last season, there was a barn owl nesting in an oak on the upper pond and I have often seen a pair of hobbies hawking for dragonflies there.” Mark Lloyd, Chief Executive of the Angling Trust said: “Peter has single-handedly contributed to the salvation of an important fish species for angling while at the same time restoring one of the country’s most threatened habitats: small ponds, along with the plethora of wildlife that are associated with them.

We are privileged that he is the first winner of this award and hope that he will inspire others. We are very grateful to everyone who took the time to apply. We will be promoting the vast amount of work carried out by the angling community to Government in discussions about how we can contribute to the Big Society agenda.” Vincent Hedley Lewis, Chairman of The CLA Game Fair Board said: “Peter is an outstanding role model who hopefully will have inspired many people to improve the water aspects of their land. Improving environmental habitat is an invaluable asset to be appreciated with grateful thanks by generations to come.” Peter Rolfe said: “Fred J Taylor’s book on tench was one of the inspirations for my field pond work in the 1970s and I feel very honoured to have won an award named after him. I am grateful to the sponsors for this opportunity to highlight the plight of the crucian carp, a fish that has been under-valued until now.

Peter Rolfe is the winner of the first Fred J Taylor Award

 

Their generosity will help me greatly in my latest project, the restoration of six derelict ponds, in two acres of marvellous wetland, where I plan to continue my research into this remarkable fish and to breed many more for waters all over the country.” Notes to Editors:

1. Fred J Taylor. Extracts from an obituary in The Times. Fred. J. Taylor, MBE, angler and writer, died on May 7, 2008, aged 89. He led a life exploring the outdoors, shooting and fishing. He was an expert chef and cooked much of the game he killed. He always had a passion for the environment in which he hunted. His first fishing piece appeared in Angling Times in 1954. He went on to write for many newspapers and magazines, among them The Daily Telegraph, the London Evening Standard, Shooting Times and Saga magazine.He produced numerous books, among them Angling in Earnest, Tench, A Guide to Ferreting, One for the Pot and Reflections of a Countryman.

2. The Fred J Taylor Award. The Angling Trust, in conjunction with The CLA Game Fair, are honouring this great man’s memory with an annual award, the first of which is awarded to Peter Rolfe. A £1,000 cash prize will initially be offered, along with a certificate and trophy. The funds should be spent on furthering the activity for which the award was given and we will invite winners to report back the following year about how the funds were helpful. Applications and nominations are requested from anyone who is, or knows someone else who is, involved in protecting or improving water habitats in England. Individuals, projects and organisations are all eligible for the award. Otherwise there are no constraints on applications. We are keen to highlight the magnificent work that anglers around the country do to clear up litter, restore damaged habitats and prevent pollution.

3. Peter Rolfe’s book, Crock of Gold – Seeking the Crucian Carp, can be obtained from Mpress 0845 408 2606 or at www.calmproductions.com.

4. List of Runners-up in alphabetical order:

Avon Roach Project: a project to reverse the decline in roach populations in the Hampshire Avon run by Trevor Harrop and Budgie Price by installing artificial spawning boards in the river and hatching the spawn in a hatchery at Ringwood. 80,000 one year old fry have been raised and released into stewponds in the past two years for release into the river.

Mr Jeff Marley was nominated by the York & District Amalgamation of Anglers, for whom Mr. Marley has been a committee member for over 24 years. He has in that time worked tirelessly as a volunteer to improve the club’s fisheries and virtually single-handedly built their Laybourne Lakes complex by de-silting a derelict pond and digging a new one. He installed platforms with disabled access around both waters and built a bridge to provide access to the island pegs.

Otterspool Angling Club, Watford was founded 20 years ago by a small group of anglers who secured a licence to fish a mile of the River Colne near Watford. In 2006, anti-social behaviour including littering, fires, poaching and vandalism on neighbouring waters threatened to see the river closed to fishing entirely. The club put a proposal to the Munden Estate to take on the additional mile and have since cleared it of all litter (including 67 black bags, a front door and a fridge) and have restored the habitat using large woody debris to secure the banks and create in-river habitat for spawning. Following a pollution incident in 2008, the club negotiated a 3 year fish stocking programme with the Environment Agency.

River Erewash Foundation: A project set up by anglers on the River Erewash, once the 2nd most polluted river in Europe, on the border between Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire. The volunteers have installed natural flow deflectors, cleaned gravels, removed rubbish (including a 3 piece suite, a mountain of shopping trolleys and a complete fitted kitchen), monitored invertebrates and has worked with local schools.

Sankey Angling Club have had the fishing rights to Dimmingsdale Reservoir, and a stretch of the adjacent Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal in Staffordshire since the 1940s. The club has improved the environment of their waters with the help of countless volunteers aged from 7 to 75. Work has included rescuing fish from the canal in a pollution incident, management of water vegetation, installation of 30 bird and bat boxes, maintaining fish stocks, introducing 40 metres of floating island fish havens, removal of mink.

5. Contact Angling Trust, Eastwood House, 6 Rainbow Street, Leominster, Herefordshire, HR6 8DQ. 0844 7700616 www.anglingtrust.net [email protected] Out of hours press enquiries: Mark Lloyd 07973 468198

Wheely Boat Press Release July 2010

Submitted by Mandi on August 2, 2010 - 2:19pm

Suzuki Logo

 

 


*Press Release* Press Release* Press Release* Press Release*

Toft Newton Trout Fishery wins 2010 Alan Faulkner Memorial Award

On behalf of The Wheelyboat Trust, veteran actor and passionate angler Bernard Cribbins presented Jason Foster of Toft Newton Trout Fishery with this year’s Alan Faulkner Memorial Award. The presentation took place on Friday, 23rd July at the CLA Game Fair, held this year at Ragley Hall. The main prize was a 4hp outboard motor provided by the award’s sponsors, Suzuki Marine.

Created in memory of the Trust’s Founder President, the award is presented annually to the game fishery that provides disabled anglers with the most outstanding service, facilities, opportunities and access. Previous winners include Eyebrook Trout Fishery, Tweed Foundation, Grafham Water and Lake of Menteith. Toft Newton Trout Fishery is a small reservoir in the heart of rural Lincolnshire and is well established as Lincolnshire’s number one trout fishing venue.

The 40 acre reservoir provides excellent sport for all trout anglers from beginners to expert. It is a concrete bowl and consequently has its limitations in terms of access for disabled anglers but gets round this by operating one of the original Mk I Wheelyboats to run alongside its fleet of standard boats. However, what impressed the judges the most was the attitude and determination of Jason Foster, the fishery’s owner, to ensure that disabled anglers can get on the water and fish.CLA Game Fair 2010

The service he offers is exemplary. While bank access is limited for wheelchair users, the fishing lodge, loos and parking are all accessible, essential requirements for a hassle-free day’s fishing in their Wheelyboat. As well as being a fitting memorial to The Wheelyboat Trust’s Founder President who conceived the idea of the wheelchair accessible boat, the ‘Wheelyboat’, the award is intended to highlight the needs of disabled anglers and encourage fisheries to ensure those needs are accommodated. The Trust is delighted that Suzuki Marine sponsored the award again this year with the main prize of a 4hp 4-stroke outboard. Without their support and appreciation of the award’s aims, it would not be the sought after title it has now become.

The Suzuki small outboard range, from 4 to 15 horsepower, has attracted a strong following amongst anglers, due to the quiet running, low emissions and 4-stroke fuel economy. In common with the rest of the 2hp to 300hp range, they offer excellent value for money. Background The Wheelyboat Trust is a registered charity that promotes and provides the wheelchair accessible Wheelyboat to fisheries and other waters open to the public all over the UK. It has now supplied 136 Wheelyboats since the Trust began work in 1985. It offers four different types of Wheelyboat to suit different activities - two of these have been designed specifically for fishing.

This is the seventh year that Suzuki Marine has sponsored the Alan Faulkner Memorial Award. The Wheelyboat Trust (reg charity no 292216) - Andy Beadsley - Director North Lodge
Burton Park
Petworth
West Sussex
GU28 0JT Telephone: 01798 342222
Mbl: 07860 650023
email: [email protected]
www.wheelyboats.org

Fishing Days At Kennick With South West Fishing For Life

Submitted by Mandi on July 27, 2010 - 11:06am

 

       ****** South West Fishing For Life ******


 

 

South West Fishing For Life is delighted to announce the start of another group on a Kennick lake in Devon thanks to SWLakes Trust. The days at Kennick are the 2nd Sunday of the month starting at 2pm and finishing with a delicious tea provided by our lovely volunteers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All our sessions at the lakes are free to people who have suffering or recovered from breast cancer, thanks to donations, fund raising events and    grants and the generosity of SWLakes Trust. We are now planning another club on a lake in Cornwall for next year. Please look at www.southwestfishingforlife.org.uk to read all about us and to see forth coming fund raising events or contact us. We look forward to hearing from you.

 

 Enquiries Please Contact:

  Gillian 01398 371244  Email: [email protected]

  Chris Hall  Email:   [email protected]

 



 

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